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1882 Tour from Shimla through Bhushaher , Kinnaur and Spiti to Lahul By Mrs. J.C.Murray Aynsley

Kinnaur PREFACE THINKING that possibly some of my sister tourists may be wishing to make the same round as ourselves but feel doubtful of its feasibility, I venture to put forth this account of our three months' tour in a part of The Himalayas but little known to English travelers. This short sketch will show them that it is possible, and also how it can be done. English sportsmen who go to Spiti in search of the big game usually takes the shorter route up the Wangtu valley and over the Babeh pass (only possible for pedestrians). This brings them into Spiti a few miles above Dhankar. As far as I can learn, few (if any) English ladies have ever marched the same way as ourselves; nor would I advise anyone to do so unless provided with a good strong mountain pony, and also with some means of being carried over certain of the most difficult places. A steady head is also required, for at times it is absolutely necessary to walk along ridges of rock or the edges of steep p

The Abode of Snow [ Journey from Chinese Tibet to the Indian Caucasus, through the upper valleys of the Himalaya ]

The Abode of Snow Contents PREFACE IN the twenty-ninth chapter of this work, I have fully explained how the phrase "Abode of Snow " is a literal translation of the Sanskrit compound " Himalaya," and therefore forms an appropriate title for a work treating of those giant mountains. The Abode of Snow  par excellence  is not in the Himalaya, or even in the Arctic region, but (setting Saturn aside) in the Antarctic region. Owing to the greater preponderance of ocean in the southern hemisphere, the greatest accumulation of ice is around the South Pole and hence the not improbable theory that, when the accumulation has reached a certain point, the balance of the earth must be suddenly destroyed, and this orb shall almost. instantaneously turn transversely to its axis, moving the great oceans, and so producing one of those cyclical catastrophes which, there is some reason to believe, have before now interfered with the development and the civilization

GUIDE TO DALHOUSIE, CHAMBA AND THE INNER MOUNTAINS BETWEEN SHIMLA AND KASHMIR BY J. HUTCHISON, L.R,.C.P. & S.E. CHAMBA

Dhauladhar Range  This Guide was first published as a Guide to  Dalhousie only by the late Col. J. H. Hutchinson in 1869-70. A second edition appeared in 1883 d  Mr. R. L. Harris, C. S. The third edition in 1910  edited by Mr. H. A. Rose, C. S., contained much additional the information which has been greatly supplemented  in the present addition. The main aim has  been to give only such information as is likely to be  of permanent value and all rules about supplies,  transport, shooting, etc., are therefore omitted as they change almost every year. It is practically  a new Guide. Contents THE ROUTE TO DALHOUSIE The main road to Dalhousie runs from Pathankot via  Dhar and Dunera in the outer hills. After leaving Pathankot it follows for 6 miles the Kangra Valley road and then turning sharply to the left enters the low hills. Ascending by an easy gradient it surmounts the first ridge of the Shivalik and descends into the dun beyond, through which it